My Kamusi - Login
username
password
You can Register Here ,   OR

Kiswahili Grammar Notes: Process Verbs

Process Verbs

104 In Swahili, there are a number of verbs which may be called "process verbs" or "verbs of becoming" because they describe an action which will result in a state or position, while the English counterpart to these words describes the state or position itself, rather than the action that resulted in that state or position.

For this reason, the ME tense is used with these verbs when indicating that the state or position has been achieved, while the English counterpart would be stated in the present tense. Here are some examples:

KUSIMAMA

to stand: a) to get into a standing position
b) to stop moving and become stationary
Nimesimama
I am standing i.e., I am in a standing position as a result of the action of standing up.
OR
I am standing still; i.e., I have stopped moving and am now standing still.

KUKETI

to sit; i.e., to move from a standing or lying position to a sitting position
Nimeketi
I am sitting; i.e., I have sat down (or up)

KULALA

to lie down; i.e., to move into a lying position.
Nimelala
I am lying down; i.e., I have lain down.

KUCHOKA

to get tired
Amechoka
He is tired; i.e., he has become tired.

KULEWA

to get drunk
Wamelewa
they are drunk; i.e., they have become tipsy

KUCHELEWA

to get late
Nimechelewa
I am late (lit. I have been overtaken by the dawn).

KUPIGA MAGOTI

to kneel down
Amepiga magoti
She is kneeling; i.e., she has got down on her knees.

KUJAA

to get full; i.e., be in process of being filled up.
Kikapu kimejaa
Ghe basket is full; i.e., the basket has been filled to the top.

KUTOKA

to come out of, to go out of, to emerge.
Ametoka Ujerumani
He is from Germany; i.e., he has come out of Germany.

KUCHUKUA

to take, take away
Amechukua kikapu
She is carrying the basket; i.e., she has taken it and now has it, is carrying it.

KUOA

to marry (of a man)
Ameoa
He is married; i.e., he has married.

KUOLEWA

to get married (of a woman)
Ameolewa
She is married; i.e., she has got married.

KUVAA

to get dressed, put on clothes
Amevaa suruali
He is wearing trousers; i.e., he has put on trousers

KUKOSA

to err, make a mistake
Wamekosa
They are guilty; i.e., they have done something wrong

KUUMIA

to get hurt, injured
Nimeumia
I am injured, i.e., I have suffered injury

Do not infer, from the above examples, that process verbs can be used only with the ME tense:. They can be used with other tenses also; but, of course, the meaning changes with the change of tense. Compare:

Nimechoka. I am tired.
Nilichoka. I became tired.

Amelala. She is asleep/in bed.
Atalala.
She will sleep/lie down.

Umesimama. You are standing/standing still.
Ulisimama. You stood/stopped.

 

Thanks to Johnetta Myers for assistance preparing this page for the Web.

/content/process-verbs

Kamusi GOLD

These are the languages for which we have datasets that we are actively working toward putting online. Languages that are Active for you to search are marked with "A" in the list below.

Key

•A = Active language, aligned and searchable
•c = Data 🔢 elicited through the Comparative African Word List
•d = Data from independent sources that Kamusi participants align playing 🐥📊 DUCKS
•e = Data from the 🎮 games you can play on 😂🌎🤖 EmojiWorldBot
•P = Pending language, data in queue for alignment
•w = Data from 🔠🕸 WordNet teams

Software and Systems

We are actively creating new software for you to make use of and contribute to the 🎓 knowledge we are bringing together. Learn about software that is ready for you to download or in development, and the unique data systems we are putting in place for advanced language learning and technology:

Articles and Information

Kamusi has many elements. With these articles, you can read the details that interest you:

Videos and Slideshows

Some of what you need to know about Kamusi can best be understood visually. Our 📽 videos are not professional, but we hope you find them useful:

Partners

Our partners - past, present, and future - include:

Hack Kamusi

Here are some of the work elements on our task list that you can help do or fund:

Theory of Kamusi

Select a link below to learn about the principles that guide the project's unique approach to lexicography and public service.

Contact Us

We welcome your comments and questions, and will try to respond quickly. To get in touch, please visit our contact page. You must use a real email address if you want to get a real reply!

kamusigold.org/info/contact

© Copyright ©

The Kamusi Project dictionaries and the Kamusi Project databases are intellectual property protected by international copyright law, ©2007 through ©2018, under the joint ownership of Kamusi Project International and Kamusi Project USA. Further explanation may be found on our © Copyright page.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License.

Commentary

Discussion items about language, technology, and society, from the Kamusi editor and others. This box is growing. To help develop or fund the project, please contact us!

Our biggest struggle is keeping Kamusi online and keeping it free. We cannot charge money for our services because that would block access to the very people we most want to benefit, the students and speakers of languages around the world that are almost always excluded from information technology. So, we ask, request, beseech, beg you, to please support our work by donating as generously as you can to help build and maintain this unique public resource.

/info/donate

Frequently Asked Questions

Answers to general questions you might have about Kamusi services.

We are building this page around real questions from members of the Kamusi community. Send us a question that you think will help other visitors to the site, and frequently we will place the answer here.

Try it : Ask a "FAQ"!

Press Coverage

Kamusi in the news: Reports by journalists and bloggers about our work in newspapers, television, radio, and online.

Sponsor Search:
Who Do You Know?



To keep Kamusi growing as a "free" knowledge resource for the world's languages, we need major contributions from philanthropists and organizations. Do you have any connections with a generous person, corporation, foundation, or family office that might wish to make a long term impact on educational outcomes and economic opportunity for speakers of excluded languages around the world? If you can help us reach out to a potential 💛😇 GOLD Angel, please contact us!